Michigan should consider abandoning its one-person emergency management structure and instead install a team of three experts when deficit-ridden municipalities and school districts fall under state control.

That's according to a report released Wednesday by a legislative committee that investigated Flint's lead-tainted water crisis.

Nine current or former government workers have been criminally charged since medical experts detected elevated levels of lead in children due to the water supply in the impoverished city of nearly 100,000.

The report makes a raft of recommendations intended to prevent a repeat of such a crisis in the state.

It suggests replacing lead service pipes statewide, lifting emergency managers' general immunity from civil lawsuits and prohibiting them from using cost as the primary factor in any decision that will affect public health and safety.