This Sunday, March 11, our clocks will spring forward beginning at 2:00 a.m.

Daylight Saving Time was designed years ago to save energy and help farmers during harvest.

In 2005, an energy bill cosponsored by Congressman Fred Upton, extended Daylight Saving Time an extra month starting in 2007. Research has not shown an overwhelming amount of energy saved, but the time change has shown to help farmers.

A farmer at Bowerman Blueberries Farm told WZZM 13 the extra hour of sun allows them a full day of berry picking.

"We are on DST for eight months out of the year anyway," said Rep. Peter Lucido, R- Shelby Township.

Lucido wanted to get rid of DST all together, but after backlash from the golf industry, he amended it to read as a time zone switch to permanent DST time year-round.

He cites studies that relate the time change to a loss of sleep, which can affect our ability to function, as a key reason for the bill.

Health studies have shown this can lead to an increase in workplace accidents and car accidents.

Michigan is not the only state proposing this, at least 18 other states considered DST related bills in 2017, but none of the measures passed. However, states like Hawaii and Arizona have already eliminated it.

The difficulty is that the federal government gives states the choice of observing DST, but in order to switch to it permanently -- Michigan would need approval from the federal government to change time zones.

Tips on how to prepare children for the upcoming time change from John Schuen, MD, division chief for Pulmonary at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital.

1. Preparation is key: You can be proactive in resetting your little one’s body clock. Since children who are used to going to bed at 7 p.m. will now be going to bed at 6 p.m., try making naptime and bedtime a little later in the days and nights leading up to Daylight Saving fallback to make the transition easier.

2. Expect some early rising: Be prepared for some temporary early rising just after the time change. After all what was 6 a.m. one day, is now 5 a.m. the next day! Be firm about your wake up rules and when everyone can get out of the bed or crib to start their day.

3. Dry babies are happy babies: Very important to note, a dry diaper is key to ensuring your baby sleeps through the night.

4. Adjust Your Schedule: It may feel strange, but adjusting your schedule to the new Sunday morning clock times will help everyone to transition easier. Move your meals, naps and bedtimes to sync with the time change. Your baby may need an additional bonus nap to make it until the new later bedtime on Sunday. Though your family may take a few days to make the complete transition, a gradual change should help to avoid having cranky, tired children.

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