Evaluation ordered for man accused of running pickup into Hart department store

A Judge today ordered a mental competency exam for a man who crashed a pickup truck through the entrance of an Oceana County department store.

HART, MICH. - A man accused of crashing his vehicle into an Oceana County department store earlier this month has been ordered to undergo a mental competency exam.

A district court judge approved the exam for Matthew Krueger to determine if he understands the criminal charges against him and can assist in his own defense.

It comes less than two years after he pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to crashing a vehicle into a U.S. Coast Guard security gate in Grand Haven and setting fire to a building in Oceana County.

Related: ShopKo rammer driving 'weapon called a Dodge Ram' says witness

In the latest incident, Krueger is accused of crashing a pickup through the ShopKo Hometown store in Hart.  The May 3 incident occurred after he reportedly had issues with a prescription at the store pharmacy.

Krueger, 35, is charged with malicious destruction of a building, felonious assault and reckless driving.

Krueger garnered headlines in Feb. 2015 when he called in a bomb threat to the U.S. Coast Guard station in Grand Haven and rammed a gate with his vehicle. He was also charged with burning down the family’s pole barn in Oceana County.

After entering pleas in that case, Krueger was sent to the Michigan Center For Forensic Psychiatry in Ann Arbor in the fall of 2015. He remained there, as a patient, until at least March of 2016. That is where at least two doctors labeled him as mentally ill and legally insane. They also said he was not criminally responsible for his crimes.

Earlier: Man who drove through store previously crashed into Coast Guard station

In a report from the facility, a doctor wrote that Krueger "now understands his mental illness.... and has a good plan for the future," according to records in Ottawa County Probate Court. The report said Krueger needed one more year of continuing hospitalization.

Shortly after that, an Ottawa County judge approved his move back to Oceana County for outpatient treatment. Those court documents list his parents’ house in Mears as the place where he was residing.

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