Senior citizens watch total solar eclipse, some for the second time

Seniors eclipse watch party

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. - Residents of Heather Hills Retirement Village in Grand Rapids Township watched the total solar eclipse Monday. For many, it was their second time seeing one that passed over the entire country -- the first happened on Feb. 26, 1979.

Tami Yates, the community's activities director, tried to secure glasses for the watch party. But every place she called was sold out, so she looked for alternatives.

"We've made a couple of devices, so that hopefully they'll be able to see the sun," Yates said. "We've made some pinhole through cardboard [to reflect] onto another [surface...so] we're excited to see the shadows and the different things on the ground."

WZZM 13 brought a pair of glasses to the event, which people passed around.

"We're very fortunate to see these things, to experience what will be history some day," said Jeannine Miller, who has lived in Heather Hills four years. 

People were optimistic about seeing the next total solar eclipse in the U.S., which will happen on April 8, 2024.

"Seven years?" said eight-year resident Phyllis Stoming. "By gosh, maybe we'll make it. That's an incentive. That's really an incentive."

Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the WZZM 13 app now.

Have a news tip? Email news@wzzm13.com, visit our Facebook page or Twitter.

© 2017 WZZM-TV


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment