Here's what you need to know about the Lead Task Force meetings

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. - Kent County is home to 615 lead-poisoned children, which only accounts for children actually tested. 

One Grand Rapids zip code had the highest number of lead-poisoned children in the state, during 2015. This comes according to data from the Michigan Dept. of Health and Human Services, which identified the zip code 49507 as having a 40 percent increase in lead poisoning cases in the last two years. 

The Kent County Lead Task Force assembled in order to create a plan - after spending more than a year investigating the problem. 

Now, the community has the chance to lend their voice to the discussion. 

Two public meetings happening on Thursday, Nov. 30 and Friday, Dec. 1 allow members of the public to come share their concerns, get connected with resources and review the taskforce's recommendations. Get registered for those meetings here

Information on each meeting:

Thursday, November 30, 2017
6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Human Services Complex
121 Franklin SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49507

Friday, December 1, 2017
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
MSU Extension
775 Ball NE
Grand Rapids, MI 49503 

Those who cannot make it to a meeting can also submit a survey to the taskforce. 

Taskforce overarching recommendations to the Kent County Board of Commissioners:

• Charge the Kent County Community Health Advisory Committee (CHAC) to work with
stakeholders to develop plans by June 30, 2018, for how the community can work toward
fulfilling this report’s recommendations.

• Charge CHAC to review elevated blood lead levels (EBLL), monitor progress on this report’s
recommendations, and update the community at least once a year.

• Encourage State of Michigan officials to implement the recommendations of the Governor’s
Child Lead Poisoning Elimination Board in its November 2016 report, A Roadmap to Eliminating
Child Lead Exposure.

These are just the primary recommendations, to read up on the full recommendations click here. 

Lastly, anyone with a child between 9 and 12 months or 24 and 36 months of age should be tested by their medical provider for lead poisoning. 

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© 2017 WZZM-TV


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