Will Wolverine Worldwide finish installing 338 water filters by Thanksgiving? Maybe.

Water filter installation getting faster near Rockford

PLAINFIELD TOWNSHIP, MICH. - Wolverine Worldwide is speeding up whole-house filter installations for homes in Plainfield Township. But the shoemaker may not finish installing the 300-plus filters it claimed would be complete by Thanksgiving, said Belmont homeowners Monday.

It took Wolverine contractors 11 hours each to install whole-house filters at the two homes in Belmont with well water that tested highest for PFOS, the toxic Scotchgard chemical found at the company's old dumpsite on House Street.

"I'm looking at, in talking with the contractor, about five to six hours," said Luke Carney. The water at his home on Chandler Drive tested at 147.9 parts per trillion (ppt) for PFAS, under which PFOS falls. The Environmental Protection Agency's safety advisory level for PFAS is 70 ppt.

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality recently sent a letter to Wolverine executives requesting the company take more setps to identify all its possible contaminated dumpsites and provide all residents in the area "immediate access to safe drinking water."

Wolverine Worldwide promised whole-house filtration systems to all 338 homes in the first expanded testing zone on October 12. Last week, the company said all the filters would be installed by Thanksgiving.

"Each filter is customized for each home and installation times will vary," a Wolverine spokesperson said when asked if the company would finish by the holiday. "Wolverine and its contractor are working diligently to get the filters in as fast as possible. Our priority is with installing filters first where the PFAS is detected."

Carney and others on Chandler Drive with water that tested above 70 ppt for PFAS said Wolverine hitting the deadline depends on the number of contractors the company hires.

"Once they get five to 10 [installations] under their belt, each person, they're guessing each contractor will be able to do two a day at bare minimum," Carney said. "So depending on how many [people] they have in the field...it's very possible to do it." 

Wolverine clarified its position Tuesday saying it plans to have water filters at all homes with detectable levels of PFAS completed by Thanksgiving. 

Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the WZZM 13 app now.

Have a news tip? Email news@wzzm13.com, visit our Facebook page or Twitter.

© 2017 WZZM-TV


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment