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ANN ARBOR (DETROIT FREE PRESS) - They could have called the game at halftime.

John Beilein could have celebrated his 61st birthday a little earlier.

Zak Irvin and Glenn Robinson III could have found a cold tub to keeping them from burning up.

And Nebraska could have taken off quicker to avoid another storm.

Instead, everyone hung around Crisler Center for a 40-minute basketball clinic courtesy of the Wolverines, delaying their plans as the No. 10 Wolverines pounded Nebraska, 79-50, Wednesday night.

This was an opponent that entered with the same Big Ten record as U-M faced at Indiana.

A team that had beaten the Hoosiers just days before the Wolverines limped to the finish in Bloomington.

One that lost in the final seconds, by only one point to Michigan the first time they met a month ago.

But there was bad mojo headed their way.

The Wolverines (17-5, 9-1 Big Ten) were coming off their first loss the Big Ten season and were looking for redemption.The Cornhuskers (11-10, 3-6) were heading on the road, where they entered 0-6 this season.

And the Wolverines are, like most teams, dramatically better on their home court, now 10-1 with a loss only to Top 5 Arizona.

As expected, the dominant first half set the tone, with U-M rolling up 75 points in the first 30 minutes as Robinson ended up tying his season high with 23 points and the Wolverines shot 50% from the field and 41.9% from three-point range.

The first half buried this game early, as the Wolverines led at halftime with a misprint, 49-21.The Wolverines played an ideal 20 minutes, dominating from three-point range (9-of-17), sharing the ball (13 assists on 15 baskets), with a hot hand (16 from Zak Irvin).

They shot 10-of-10 from the free throw line and got all the rolls.

When Nebraska threatened the first time, they dropped a 12-0 run to pull away.

After the Cornhuskers broke the streak, U-M ripped off a 15-0 run.

Want dominance?

In just over an eight-minute span, Michigan used a 29-3 run to end the competitive portion of the game with three minutes left in the half.

BY MARK SNYDER - DETROIT FREE PRESS

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