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ORLANDO – Wade Davis arrived at the NFL annual meetings expecting his presentations on respect for gay players in a pro football locker room to be well received.

Davis, a former defensive back who came out in 2012, nine years after his last stint on an NFL roster ended, had already received so much positive feedback from meetings in New York with NFL officials, including commissioner Roger Goodell, over the past several months.

But there was a moment after his second presentation, this one to team owners on Tuesday morning, that confirmed to Davis just how much impact he had made in the quest to eliminate homophobia in the NFL.

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Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys and arguably the most famous of the league's 32 owners, told Davis that he and the Cowboys would welcome an openly gay player.

"When someone like him speaks out, the world changes," Davis told USA TODAY Sports.
But it wasn't just Jones. It was coaches like John Fox of the Denver Broncos, who called Davis' presentation the best he had ever seen at these annual meetings, and Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank, who said it is up to NFL owners to spearhead this culture change.

Respect in the workplace has been the overarching theme at the league's annual meetings, from the fallout of the Miami Dolphins locker room bullying scandal to discussions about use of racial slurs to preparations for the league's first openly gay player in former Missouri defensive end Michael Sam, who came out last month and is preparing for the draft.

"I think the most important thing is that it is a matter of respect," Blank told USA TODAY Sports. "How we live is more important that what we say about it. The guidance that we're getting from the league is outstanding, and the attention that it is getting is outstanding. But is up to us to make sure it becomes a living part of our culture, with more sensitivity, more awareness of the impact of what we're saying."

Davis said he was approached by numerous coaches and other team executives following his presentations about traveling to visit with teams. He hasn't set up any presentations yet, but Davis and Troy Vincent, the former Pro Bowl defensive back who was named the NFL's vice present of football operations, will work to set up a program for speaking directly to players.

"I might share more of my personal stories with players, but I'm going to let them know that hey, we don't want to be treated any differently, we just want to be part of the NFL family too," said Davis, who played two years for NFL Europe and participated in three NFL training camps.

Vincent told USA TODAY Sports the message Davis presents won't just be about how to accept a gay teammate, but part of a bigger conversation about professionalism, respect and workplace behavior.

Fox's Broncos team could be among those Davis visits this year, though Fox won't wait to share what he learned in Orlando once he returns to Denver.

"You need diversification in everything — even sexual orientation. It has to be in the conversation," Fox said. "I think it was very profound. It was definitely eye-opening for me."

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