Princeton

Princeton has the characteristics that any Ivy League school would welcome. First of all, he’s “very smart and intelligent for his age,” according to Princeton’s worker. She also describes him as a friendly, loving and inquisitive boy who “is able to vocalize his emotions, thoughts and feelings.” In addition, Princeton is a people person “who knows no strangers,” his foster parent says. This gregarious young man has some specific favorite foods. They include slushies, fried chicken and chicken pot pies.

Because he has experienced trauma, Princeton displays some behavior issues at times, but he’s receiving services to help him process his past and develop coping skills to manage his feelings. He also receives services to improve his communication skills. Princeton can struggle at times with behavior in school; however, he generally does well academically.

A future forever family for Princeton must be willing to adopt his older brother, Jermaine. The boys would do best with two experienced parents who have knowledge of the impact of trauma on a child’s behavior and development. Their new parents also must be strong advocates for the services that will help Jermaine and Princeton thrive at home and in school. Finally, the boys would do best as the only children in their new forever family.

For more information on Princeton: http://www.mare.org/For-Families/View-Waiting-Children/view/Detail?id=41611

Jermaine

If he were a cartoon character, Jermaine would be as popular as Mickey Mouse. Well, sort of. After all, he’s described as a “very friendly” boy who “knows no strangers.” Like Mickey, Jermaine is a good problem solver. “He is good at math in addition to being very good with addition and subtraction problems,” says Jermaine’s worker. However, his favorite “clubhouse” isn’t Mikey Mouse’s. “Jermaine likes going to Sam’s Club,” says his worker, who adds that he also enjoys being outdoors, riding his bike and playing football. When he gets older, Jermaine wants to become a firefighter. In some ways, Jermaine is already older than his age. One worker describes Jermaine as having “an old soul” and says that he is a peacemaker.

Jermaine shows some behavior issues at times related to the trauma he experienced. However, Jermaine receives services to help him process his past and develop coping skills to manage his emotions. He generally does well in school. “He is educationally on target and gets along well with his peers,” says Jermaine’s worker. She adds that a future forever family for Jermaine should be open to letting him participate in organized sports such as football.

A future forever family for Jermaine must be willing to adopt his younger brother, Princeton. The boys would do best with two experienced parents who have knowledge of the impact of trauma on a child’s behavior and development. Their new parents also must be strong advocates for the services that will help Jermaine and Princeton thrive at home and in school. Finally, the boys would do best as the only children in their new forever family.

For more information on Jermaine: http://www.mare.org/For-Families/View-Waiting-Children/view/Detail?id=41610

For more information, call 800-589-MARE (6273) or visit: www.mare.org.