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Three cases of Kawasaki disease in West Michigan possibly linked to COVID-19

Further testing will determine if pediatric patients have COVID 19

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — West Michigan is seeing it's first three cases of  Kawasaki disease possibly linked to COVID-19.

Kawasaki disease is an illness that causes inflammation, swelling and redness in blood vessels throughout the body. It happens in three phases, and a lasting fever usually is the first sign. The condition most often affects kids younger than 5-years-old.  

It's not known yet whether or not the cases are related to COVID-19 until further testing is done.

RELATED: Coronavirus updates, May 11: Whitmer to provide update on state's COVID-19 response

The three cases of possible COVID 19 related Kawasaki Disease in West Michigan are in children under the age of ten.

Dr. Rosemary Olivero, Division Chief for pediatric infectious diseases at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital says we can expect more cases of the Kawasaki disease to start showing up in West Michigan. In part because the virus which can be linked to influenza and cold viruses tends to circulate this time of year. Helen DeVos Children's Hospital say it normally sees a few cases of Kawasaki Disease this time every year, but three in one month is a bit unusual. Further testing will determine if the pediatric patients have COVID 19.

Here's what parents should watch for: 

  • Red "bloodshot" eyes
  • Pink rash on the back, belly, arms, legs, and genital area
  • Red, dry, cracked lips
  • Strawberry tongue (white coating with red bumps on the tongue)
  • a sore throat
  • Swollen palms of the hands and soles of the feet with a purple-red color
  • Swollen lymph glands in the neck

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