x
Breaking News
More () »

Grand Rapids's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Grand Rapids, Michigan | WZZM13.com

Could toxic algae bloom affect West Michigan's water supply?

The Wyoming and Grand Rapids sources their water from Lake Michigan. City leaders say Lake Michigan does not typically experience conditions that can lead to toxic blue-green algae blooms.
A sample glass of Lake Erie water is photographed near the City of Toledo's water intake crib Sunday in Lake Erie, about 2.5 miles off the shore of Curtice, Ohio.

WYOMING, Mich. (WZZM) -- The City of Wyoming says residents do not need to be concerned about water quality from Lake Michigan following the toxic situation this past weekend in Toledo.

More than 400,000 residents in northwest Ohio and southern Michigan were told not to use the tap water for drinking, cooking, bathing, or washing after an algae bloom in Lake Erie caused toxins to enter the water supply.

RELATED: Toledo drinking water deemed safe after three days

The Wyoming and Grand Rapids sources their water from Lake Michigan. City leaders say Lake Michigan does not typically experience conditions that can lead to toxic blue-green algae blooms. Lake Michigan is also deeper and colder than Lake Erie, and warmer water temperatures are conducive to algal growth.

Wyoming analyzes its source water on a regular basis for the presence of the algae. While it is occasionally identified, its relative abundance is far too low to trigger the condition that Toledo experienced for three days this weekend.

Communities that use Wyoming's drinking water are:

  • City of Wyoming
  • City of Grandville
  • City of Hudsonville
  • City of Kentwood (approximately half; the other half is served by Grand Rapids)
  • Georgetown Township
  • Jamestown Township
  • Olive & Blendon Townships
  • Holland Township
  • Park Township (partially)
  • Byron & Gaines Townships