LANSING, Mich — The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is one of only seven recipients to receive a grant from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to fund a multi-site PFAS health study. 

According to the Tuesday announcement, the $1 million grant will fund an investigation into the relationship between drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and health affects. 

The grant will allow Michigan to contribute directly to a nationwide health study of PFAS, according to Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health for MDHHS. It will also allow the state to expand on a  multi-year effort underway in West Michigan communities, including Parchment and northern Kent County.

According to MDHHS, officials will conduct the research project in the City of Parchment, Cooper Township and the North Kent County area. These communities were selected for the study because uniquely high PFAS levels have been found in their drinking water and their populations are large enough to meet the requirements of the grant. 

Michigan aims to recruit 1,000 adults and 300 children across the selected communities to participate in the project, however a start date for recruitment and data collection has yet to be determined. 

MDHHS was awarded $1 million for year one of the study. The amounts for future years haven't been released.

For more information on PFAS in Michigan, visit Michigan.gov/pfasresponse.

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